Student-loan-debt-forgiveness plans by --biden-administration

I think that part of the introduction was a reference to their more advanced teaching for high school math, rather than saying that was the purpose of this one, but I could be wrong. This was a review of it from the time.

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I think it’s clear that the kids that actually do the work and get legitimate As and Bs are graduating with a higher level of knowledge in most subjects than in the past, especially the distant past. What worries me is how high that number is. I think the number of kids being pushed to the next grade/graduating without actually doing the work to pass has increased dramatically over the past few decades. If 20% of kids got Fs for years and years and all of a sudden that number is down to 12%, there might be something else behind that besides “kids today are smarter,” don’t you think? It’s part of the reason that a HS degree is becoming worthless. The adjustment to grading that has happened during the pandemic is only going to exacerbate this problem. Under the 88% statistic, kids at least had to show up to pass. Now that isn’t even the case!

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I know this is not necessary representative of the country, but here’s NYC’s performance stats for their schools.

While state officials lauded scoring increases, only 47.4 percent of city students in grades 3 to 8 scored at proficient levels in English and 45.6 percent made the grade in math, according to the numbers.

There’s more in the article if you’re interested, especially how the charter schools are doing very well in absolute terms, not just in comparison to the relatively poor NYC public schools.

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It’s also important to note that it is particularly difficult for English as a second language (ESL) learners to score at a proficient level in basic English (duh) and math until they have become fluent. While there are “dopey” kids that can’t pass algebra scattered all over the country, the ESL kids are clustered more in cities and parts of the suburbs closer to the cities. For instance, my suburb’s schools are drastically different depending on where you live with the general rule that grades and graduation rates are lower the closer you get to the city. While the achievement levels of my suburb’s highest performing students has gone up, the increase in ESL students in other parts of the suburb has actually brought those schools’ achievement levels down. And they haven’t just gone down because those kids are bringing the average down. The fact that teachers have to go slower in classes with more ESL kids is bringing down the achievement levels of the english as a first language kids that are sharing a classroom with the ESL kids. It’s a shame because those kids are from lower income households, so they are the kids that are already behind the 8-ball. These poor kids are being weighed down even further, not by a poor school system, but by their neighbors, while the kids from families able to live further out are succeeding at greater rates.

Above = facts
Below = my political bone to pick

The left won’t admit that their immigration policies are hurting the exact people that they purport to be for. This is more proof that the left has written off blacks as a constituency and that they don’t actually do anything for them because they take their vote for granted. The right is so terrible as messaging that they can’t make this point without sounding racist. And Trump was so simple minded that even though he didn’t care about sounding racist, he never tried to make this point to parents of poor city kids who are dealing with this problem. If he had done a better job at pointing out how his immigration policies were going to improve schools for kids from poor black families, he would have increased his share of the black vote even more.

My hope for the future is that republicans no longer dance around this issue. They are going to be called racist by the left anyway, so might as well make the points and show people in the cities how conservative policies help them more than progressive policies. But first the right has to stop with the attitude that people in the cities are the problem with this country and that people in flyover country are the real Americans. That attitude is extremely toxic and also a recipe for never winning the national popular vote ever again.

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yes indeed

House Democrats last year initially proposed up to $10,000 in student loan forgiveness per borrower as part of their Covid relief proposal, though Democratic leaders significantly scaled back the proposal amid concerns about the price tag.

Separately, the House last year passed an amendment to the annual defense policy bill that would have canceled up to $10,000 of private student loan debt, though it did not survive negotiations with the GOP-controlled Senate, which has been opposed to widespread loan forgiveness. The amendment won a handful of GOP votes in the House, though some moderate Democrats voted against it.

Interesting that they passed private* student loan debt forgiveness. Maybe I shouldn’t be as worried about my FFEL Stafford UHEAA loan being eligible after all.

Between my wife and I this is possibly worth $20K

I wonder if they’re going to have a cutoff in terms of time, or if you’re supposed to get a $10k private student loan from a relative before they pass it, just in case.

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THIS.

Much like the PPP etc I’m sure there will be stipulations. The point of the thread is how to best position yourself, not argue whether they should do it/ merits. It’s going to happen at some point in the Biden admin. esp now with a Cong. majority. I guess most here don’t have student loans. I felt the same way about mortgage “mods” in 2009 etc, but it happened.

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