Does the coronavirus merit investment, or personal, concern or consideration?

Of the increase (“newly filling up”)… It helps to read a whole sentence rather than two words. This number is triple what it was two weeks ago. Triple it again, and there’s still no problem? (and that’s even if you pretend there’s no delay on test results, so the number is not at least 20-30% higher even if there’s only 2 days’ delay.)

We also have had growing testing shortages here the last couple weeks. Those are only the laboratory confirmed cases that are in hospitals. This doesn’t say the data is “wrong”, but it is clearly marked that it is not including all hospitalized covid19 cases.

Oh come on. You clearly said that 935 hospitalized covid patients was a bulk of the 1217 hospital beds with no one in them - you even circled those numbers as being “the numbers”. Otherwise you’re chart was entirely irrelevant.

“Newly” refers to new increases.

No, I said if the cases double over the next week, on the course they have been, that would potentially fill up the remaining numbers (this ignores geographic locations – you can’t just use regional or statewide numbers for available beds or ICUs unless you’re gonna ship patients hundreds of miles. Texas is a large state. ~800 miles north-south and ~800 miles east-west. Some areas are already currently at capacity and others are further away from capacity.). That’s why they’re already setting up beds in convention centers now.

Hospitalization rates in Oregon :

from : https://public.tableau.com/profile/oregon.health.authority.covid.19#!/vizhome/OregonCOVID-19PublicHealthIndicators/COVID-19Burden
versus the new cases :

from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/COVID-19_pandemic_in_Oregon

You see how the # of new cases is going through the roof in the past few weeks? But the # of hospitalizations is actually still relatively flat?

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Well hospitalization has still just about doubled in June (vs 2-4x for the cases)… Not sure how that’s considered “relatively flat”. But yeah, Oregon has a Democrat governor, so not as bad as some of the worst problem states where it 's tripled in only 2 weeks.

For Texas :

June 15th, there were 28,036 active cases and 2,518 hospitalizations = 8.9%
June 30th, 69,273 cases and 5,913 cases = 8.5%

The % is not significantly changed.

sources,
case counts : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/COVID-19_pandemic_in_Texas
hospitalizations : https://txdshs.maps.arcgis.com/apps/opsdashboard/index.html#/0d8bdf9be927459d9cb11b9eaef6101f

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Yep, texas and many other states are in a significant testing capacity issue since cases have been allowed to start exploding. So what you point out for Oregon is not similar in all other states.

What you’re “supposed to expect” from the “re-opening” plan(s) is full contract tracing and a decrease in the positivity rate to a very low single digit percentage (due to all contacts being tested so that some of the new cases can be prevented from spreading it before they develop symptoms).

Our low case # is not due to anything special our governor or the fact that she’s a Dem.

We’ve benefited from luck and circumstance more than anything.

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It means there’s more Democrat and Independent voters. Which are willing to inconvenience themselves by wearing masks and social distancing to protect others, and are much more willing to listen to scientists and health officials…

Plus the state’s policies are likely more sensical (but I have not researched Oregon’s specific policies), since the governor doesn’t have to grovel at the altar of Trump or be attacked as much on twitter and receive (a higher number than usual) of death threats after the twitter attacks.

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Your TX chart confused ICU cases with general hospitalizations.

It didn’t confuse them. I didn’t see where they expose the ICU data trends. So I was only pointing out the total hospitalizations and the shrinking available hospital beds (not just ICU).

Nope. WE are not doing anything special. Our social distancing rates are nearly exactly equal to the USA average. We’re worse than Nevada and slightly better than Utah.
Thats not why OR is doing as well as we are. Its luck and circumstance.

However the states with the most social distancing ARE pretty overwhelmingly Dem areas.

OR may be Dem controlled and mostly blue but OR is not NY or Mass in attitudes. We’re also not 80% hipster SJW’s and antifa like ‘the media’ might depict. We’re a lot closer to 50/50 in the votes than not.

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At a minimum, Oregon has mask laws. Several counties previously, statewide now.

TX (example comparison) suggests masks and forbids local areas from implementing penalties for not following local requirements.

TX governor only recently clarified that local areas can add and try to enforce some limited restrictions to businesses. Still none on individuals.
Agreed, maybe the earlier spike in Oregon has resulted in a little better compliance too (just speculating). And as seen on the chart you posted, hospitalizations and cases aren’t exactly decreasing right now in Oregon either. It just appears to be not doing as poorly as some states are right now.

Yeah this is the reality of Oregon in one chart right now:

image

Nothing to be bragging about.
Masks or not.

That remains to be seen:

The Latest: UK OKs resumption of hydroxychloroquine trial

Liberals are rooting with everything they have against the efficacy of HCQS solely because the drug’s failure would reflect poorly on President Trump, whom they loathe. Liberals have no problem with other, vastly more costly, drugs because after all the government they so worship will be picking up the tab.

You’re nuts. Everyone wants to find a vaccine or an effective treatment.

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Then why all the claims that it’s repeatedly been proven to be ineffective, when all the cited trials have been with patients already sick enough to require hospitalization? All along the hypothesis was regarding it’s preventative benefits to minimize the severity of the infection, if not ward it off entirely. Once someone is hospitalized, you’ve already missed the boat on preventing them from needing hospitalization.

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Swedish study suggests those with mild cases will still have good immunity levels afterwards to protect against future infection.

“SARS-CoV-2 induces robust memory T cell responses in antibody-seronegative and antibody-seropositive individuals with asymptomatic or mild COVID-19.”

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Edit: Meanwhile…


Lel… found the “Trump rabid core supporters” 11% in the survey…

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Calculator for your personal risk of hospitalization, ICU, and death from covid based on many health factors, age, etc.